Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi
Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi

Long Miles Farm (Natural) - Burundi

Regular price $21.00 Save $-21.00
990 in stock

Mixed berry jam, dark chocolate and walnut.

Farm: Long Miles Coffee Project
Region: Kayanza
Country: Burundi
Processing: Natural
Elevation: 1,960m
Variety: Heirloom Bourbon
Sourced Through: Upstream Coffee Imports

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We have been roasting coffee from Long Miles since 2014 - when our head roaster Adam visited them in person in the beautiful hills of Burundi. We had heard amazing things about what they were accomplishing in terms of both quality and the prices paid to the growers - it was all true - and then some. They are truly re-inventing both what Burundian coffee can be and what a transparent, premium based and sustainable coffee chain means. From Adam, in regards to one of his career highlights:

"It’d be from my first origin trip, walking down a dirt road into the Long Miles Coffee Project Bukeye washing station in the hills of Kayanza, Burundi. It was the end of a long day and the air was thick with the aromas of cherry pulp, fermentation and coffee flowers. Unforgettable."

This lot comes from Long Miles Coffee Project's own farm! The farm is situated above their Heza washing station. A little similar to the LMCP Scout’s 'farmer field schools' in that it also serves as a demonstration farm for local growers - showcasing best practices, from planting indigenous shade trees, inter-cropping, mulching and pruning and much more!


About Long Miles Coffee Project:

"We are a small American family living in Burundi, which is smack dab in the heart of east Africa. We are passionate about producing amazing coffee and caring for the well-being of the coffee farmers who grow it. We weren’t always coffee producers. First, we were a family with a dream.

Our dream was that one day we could facilitate direct and meaningful relationships between coffee roasters and coffee growers by producing great coffee and telling the story of the farmers who grow it. If we could do that, then the local farming community would thrive and the world would gain the gift of great Burundi coffee.

After some time sourcing coffee in Burundi, we realized that the only way we could see our dream come true was to build a washing station. That way, we could control the coffee quality and the price the farmers were given for their coffee. In our first season, with the help of our friends and devoted blog readers, we sold all the coffee before it even hit the drying tables. This overwhelming support allowed us to pay our farmers months before any other washing station in our area, and we quickly became established as a vital part of the community.

Living as a family in this part of Africa isn’t always easy, and sometimes we share the raw and honest truth about what that’s like on our blog. We rattle on about our Faith, raising boys in Africa and the expat life. We also share the stories of our coffee farmers, what it’s like at our washing stations and how we brew our morning coffee. So, if you want the real deal about life, hit that blog button.

If you are a roaster and would like to contact us about building a relationship with our family that works for both you and our farmers, please hit the contact button. If you are a lover of coffee or Africa or travel or adventure and you just want to connect with us, we’d love to hear from you too.

'Murakoze cane' (thank you very much)"

- The Carlson Family (Ben, Kristy, Myles, Neo, and Ariana)


About Burundi:

Located in the Great Rift Valley on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, Burundi is a small landlocked nation bordered by Rwanda, Tanzania, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. After being colonized first by the Germans and then by the Belgians, Burundi gained independence in 1962 when it became a monarchy. Violence followed, and then Burundi became a single party state in 1966. A bloody history of ethnic cleansing in the 1970’s and then again in the 1990’s have left Burundi’s economy little time to thrive, making its people some of the poorest in the world. Burundi remains a predominatly agrarian society, with just 13.4% of it’s population dwelling in cities.

Coffee and tea are Burundi’s top exports, accounting for 90% of its foreign trade. Approximately 80% of Burundians live below the poverty line. In 2018’s World Happiness Report, Burundians were rated as the least happy population on earth.
Burundi coffee is the Cinderella of the coffee world; often subject to deep misfortunes despite deserving better. Coffee came to Burundi under colonial rule through the Belgains after WWI in the 1920’s. The Belgians began to force every farmer to cultivate at least fifty coffee trees in 1933. Many of the trees farmed in Burundi today are original to the this era of forced farming. After colonial rule ended in 1962, coffee production was privatized, but rarely was anything besisdes commodity coffee produced. Since then, the sector went back under governemnt control only to re-emerge into the private sector in 1991. For the last sixty years Burundi’s rich and unique coffees have often been lost in a sea of instant and grocery store blends. But now, grown and crafted with care, Burundi coffee is emerging to find its place in the specialty limelight.

From far off, the Burundian countryside is a vast expanse of green carpeted rolling hills. Each hill is a distinct geopolitical unit with its own farming tapestry; a patchwork of banana trees, cassava coffee, tea and corn. There are no typical looking coffee estates in Burundi, instead every hill is home to between sixty and 140 smallholding coffee farming families. For most coffee farmers in Burundi, coffee is their family’s only cash crop. The average farmer who works with us has 115 coffee trees. Each coffee producing hill in Burundi has an individual micro-climate, soil structure and altitude. LMCP trace micro-lots by tracking every farming family on every hill, and documenting each day that they deliver. Every farmer has a story- and they do their best to capture not only data about coffee production, but family and home life as well.

Producing coffee in this part of Africa isn’t always easy. Harvest season often means navigating challenges like countrywide fuel shortages, water shortages, political insabilities, constantly changing government regulations or export delays. Despite all of these challenges, we’ve found Burundi coffees to be well worth the effort, and we are hopeful that you will too.

Photos taken by LMCP <3

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