White and pink coffee bag filled with coffee beans placed upon a blue bench against a pink background.
Carmela Aduviri and two men standing amongst a dense coffee bean farm in Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Three coffee enthusiasts standing in front of a large mountain in Bolivia.
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Multiple grainpro bags filled with Bolivian coffee from the farm of Carmelita.
Owner of the farm Carmela Aduviri, holding red coffee cherries in Bolivia.
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Bolivian men loading up a blue truck with bags of Bolivian coffee beans at night.
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia
Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia

Carmela Aduviri (Natural) - Bolivia

Regular price $23.00 Save $-23.00


854 in stock

Strawberry jam, candied pecans and px sherry.

Farm: Carmelita
Country: Bolivia
Province: Caranavi
Colony: Copacabana
Elevation: 1,600–1,650 masl
Variety: Caturra, Catuaí
Processing: Natural
Producer: Carmela Aduviri
Sourced Through: Melbourne Coffee Merchants

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video on tasting notes (and stories from the farm!) for Carmela Aduviri's coffee from Bolivia.

This coffee was produced by Carmela Aduviri from Copacabana, a small and remote settlement located 180 kilometres from La Paz in the heart of the Caranavi province. This region is the epicentre for specialty coffee production in Bolivia, with incredibly high altitudes, rich soil, and wide daily temperature ranges providing the perfect conditions for exceptional coffee.

The inhabitants of Copacabana first began farming coffee around 35 years ago. Farms here are small and traditional. Almost all work is carried out by the farm's owners and their extended families, with a handful of temporary workers taken on to help out during harvest. All of the producers at Copacabana were born into the Aymara, an ancient indigenous group which lived on the Altiplano (a vast plateau of the central Andes that stretches from southern Peru to Bolivia and into northern Chile and Argentina). The region was known for the world’s highest lake, called Titicaca, and when their families moved to Caranavi, they named their ‘colony’, or settlement, Copacabana.

Carmela has worked in coffee for fourty years while raising eight children. Her farm, “Carmelita”, is about 2 hectares in size, and is located at an altitude of 1,400 to 1,550 metres above sea level. Today Carmela manages the farm with her son, and together they have worked incredibly hard on improving and producing the best quality coffee they can. They grow a mix of Caturra and Catuaí variety trees on their farm, which grow in a rich clay soil under the protective shade of native forest trees, whose heavy leaf fall creates a natural mulch fertiliser, and whose canopy provides an important habitat for the many bird and insect species in the area.

The families who live in Copacabana, including the Aduviri family, used to depend on the local market to sell their coffee, meaning low prices and little reliability. Now they selectively pick their coffee cherries and are able to sell their top-grade coffees for substantially higher prices to MCM's partners at Agricafe, which processes specialty lots at its Buena Vista wet mill which is located in Caranavi.


The first of its kind in the country, the Sol de la Manaña program is aimed at sharing knowledge and technical assistance with local producers to create better quality coffees in higher quantities. By doing so Agricafe hopes that coffee production can be a viable and sustainable crop for producers, like Carmela, in the region for many years to come.

After the coffee was delivered, it was placed into a floatation tank and all floaters were removed. The whole cherries were then dried on on raised beds in the sun and turned turned regularly to ensure it dried evenly. The drying was then finished off at a very low temperature in a stationary drier. The coffee was then transported to La Paz where it was rested, and then milled at the Rodriguez family’s brand new dry mill. At the mill, the coffee was carefully screened again by machines and also by hand to remove any defects.

Carmela worked hard to collect and process the cherries for this special micro lot and carefully hand polished all of the cherries before delivering them to the mill! A whole lot of love and hard work has gone into this coffee.. we hope you enjoy it!

Read about the Sol de la Mañana program here and Pedro Rodgriguez here and about Bolivian coffee more generally here.


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